HARTING presents Fast Charging Technology

Sharply rising demand for e-mobility solutions / direct supplier to the VW Group / China making increased use of environment-friendly technologies 

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HARTING’s fast charging technology celebrated its premiere at the Geneva Motor Show 2016. Subsidiary HARTING Automotive is now recording lively demand. “Almost all new e-car concepts of the large OEMs use powerful fast charging in addition to conventional charging technology, to increase acceptance among drivers and achieve the breakthrough,” explains Marco Grinblats, Business Unit Manager E-Mobility at HARTING Automotive. Good news for HARTING: at the end of 2016 the company was chosen for the first time as a direct supplier to the VW group for a specific e-mobility solution. “This gave the whole business unit a powerful boost,” said Marco Grinblats, before the opening of the Geneva Motor Show.

HARTING has been manufacturing innovative e-mobility products and solutions for several years based on decades of experience in connection and transmission technology for data, signals and power. Its subsidiary HARTING Automotive develops and produces charging equipment for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. These include mode 2 charging cables, mode 3 charging cables and DC rapid charging plugs with approvals and certificates for all specific markets and meeting legal requirements worldwide.

Customers can deploy the equipment in line with their own individual requirements, as HARTING vehicle charging cables are available in all three plug system versions used worldwide (with the corresponding approvals) for the common AC charging interfaces. The type 1 plug is certified for AC in accordance with UL, CE and JET/PSE, and the type 2 plug for AC in accordance with UL/VDE. The HARTING GB China plug complies with the CQC standard.

HARTING Automotive is more than satisfied with its business performance to date. “The e-market is simply exploding. In China alone, over 500,000 new energy vehicles – that is to say, purely battery-driven or hybrid vehicles – were built in 2016,” explains Marco Grinblats. This requires more and more plugs, cables and charging infrastructure.

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